An international study which adds to growing evidence surrounding the cancer-causing risks of indoor tanning has prompted calls to tax the industry and increase health warnings to consumers.

The research comes as NSW pushes ahead with legislation to ban tanning salons by 2014, while Queensland is considering a similar move.

The study, published in the British Medical Journal this week, found that people who used tanning beds were more likely to develop two types of non-melanoma skin cancer, basal and squamous cell carcinoma.

The findings follow a study in the same journal in July that showed the risk of melanoma from sunbed use was 20 per cent, rising to 87 per cent if people were exposed before the age of 35.

Experts from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research said the two studies provided more convincing evidence that exposure to artificial ultraviolet radiation can cause skin cancers.

AN international study which adds to growing evidence surrounding the cancer-causing risks of indoor tanning has prompted calls to tax the industry and increase health warnings to consumers.

The research comes as NSW pushes ahead with legislation to ban tanning salons by 2014, while Queensland is considering a similar move.

The study, published in the British Medical Journal this week, found that people who used tanning beds were more likely to develop two types of non-melanoma skin cancer, basal and squamous cell carcinoma.

The findings follow a study in the same journal in July that showed the risk of melanoma from sunbed use was 20 per cent, rising to 87 per cent if people were exposed before the age of 35.

Experts from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research said the two studies provided more convincing evidence that exposure to artificial ultraviolet radiation can cause skin cancers.

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